2017 Caine Prize Workshop in Tanzania heralds new co-publishers across the Horn and Eastern Africa

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
20 March 2017

 

2017 CAINE PRIZE WORKSHOP IN TANZANIA HERALDS NEW CO-PUBLISHERS ACROSS THE HORN AND EASTERN AFRICA

Anthology to be co-published in Tanzania, Rwanda, Somaliland, Somalia, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Sudan and South Sudan.


The fifteenth annual Caine Prize workshop is being held in Tanzania for the first time, and the 2017 anthology of short stories, 12 of which are written during the workshop, will be co-published by Tanzanian Company Mkuki na Nyota, in partnership with New Internationalist - who provide a print-ready pdf to African co-publishers free of charge. Mkuki Bgoya has been commissioned to design the cover of the anthology, which in 2017 will be co-published in 16 African countries, including Rwanda for the first time, with Huza Press. In addition the Redsea Cultural Foundation will co-publish the anthology in Somaliland, Somalia, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Sudan, South Sudan and UAE.

Director of the Caine Prize, Dr Lizzy Attree said: "We are excited to bring not only the workshop to Tanzania for the first time, but to also be partnering with Mkuki na Nyota to bring Caine Prize stories to a new audience.  Working with Huza Press and the Redsea Cultural Foundation also feels historic, as it doubles the number of countries that will now be able to access African short stories in Africa.  The Prize intends to continue building supportive partnerships with independent African publishers in order to uplift the valuable work they are already doing, reaching more readers and encouraging more writers on the African continent."

Eleven writers representing ten African countries will convene at the Travellers Lodge in Bagamoyo, Tanzania, for thirteen days (21 March – 2 April) to writ­­e, read and discuss work in progress and to learn from Elise Dillsworth, literary agent and co-founder of the Diversity in Publishing Network, and Mohammed Naseehu Ali, Ghanaian author of short stories and Professor of Creative Writing at New York University.

This year's participants include the 2016 Caine Prize winner, Lidudumalingani (South Africa), as well as previously shortlisted writers Abdul Adan (Somalia/Kenya), Lesley Nneka Arimah (Nigeria) and Tendai Huchu (Zimbabwe). They will be joined by Cheryl Ntumy (Botswana/Ghana), Daniel Rafiki (Rwanda), Darla Rudakubana (Rwanda), Agazit Abate (Ethiopia), Esther Karin Mngodo (Tanzania), Lydia Kasese (Tanzania), and Zakariwa Riwa (Tanzania).

Short story author Mohammed Naseehu Ali, said: “As someone who benefited from the mentorship of established writers at the beginning of my career, I am always eager to give back when the opportunity arises. A writing workshop, be it in a school setting or informal environment such as the one held by the Caine Prize, does not only help participants with their writing but also gives them a peak into their lives as successful writers.”

During the workshop the writers are expected to write a short story for the 2017 Caine Prize anthology, which will be published by New Internationalist in the UK and Interlink in the US. The anthology will be co-published with partners in sixteen African countries; ‘amaBooks (Zimbabwe), FEMRITE (Uganda), Gadsden Publishers (Zambia), Huza Press (Rwanda), Jacana Media (South Africa), Kwani? (Kenya), Mkuki na Nyota (Tanzania), Lantern Books (Nigeria), Redsea Cultural Foundation (Somaliland, Somalia, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Sudan, South Sudan and UAE) and Sub-Saharan Publishers (Ghana).

The eleven writers will visit local schools in the Bagamoyo area, offering students an opportunity to meet the writers and exchange ideas about creativity, writing, reading and literature.

A public event featuring readings in English and specially commissioned Kiswahili translations will be held on Saturday 1st April at 6.30pm at CDEA (Culture for Development East Africa).  This event is generously supported by Zansec, CDEA and the SOMA Book Cafe.

The 2017 workshop coincides with the Jalada Mobile Literary and Arts Festival’s journey through Tanzania, and it is hoped that Abdul Adan, 2016 Caine Prize shortlisted author, workshop participant and member of the Jalada collective, will take part in the #JaladaFestival event on Saturday 25th March in Dar es Salaam. Copies of the 2016 Caine Prize anthologies have also been included on the Jalada bus, which is visiting twelve towns in five countries: Kenya, Uganda, Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Tanzania between 3rd and 31st March. The books will be donated to schools and libraries as well as sold at events on the tour.

-Ends-

NOTES TO EDITORS

The Caine Prize of £10,000 is awarded annually for a short story by an African writer published in English (indicative length 3,000 to 10,000 words). An African writer is taken to mean someone who was born in Africa, or who is a national of an African country, or who has a parent who is African by birth or nationality.  Shortlisted writers receive £500 each.

Fourteen Caine Prize writing workshops have been held to date, scheduled annually since 2003. Four have been held in South Africa, four in Kenya, and two in Ghana. Cameroon, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe have each hosted one. Further workshops are planned elsewhere in Africa in the coming years.

The Prize, awarded for African creative writing, is named after the late Sir Michael Caine, former Chairman of Booker plc and Chairman of the Booker Prize management committee for nearly 25 years.

The African winners of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Wole Soyinka and J M Coetzee, are Patrons of The Caine Prize. Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne is President of the Council, Ben Okri OBE is Vice President, Dr Delia Jarrett-Macauley is the Chairperson, Adam Freudenheim is the Deputy Chairperson and Dr Lizzy Attree is the Director.

Previous winners are: Sudan’s Leila Aboulela (2000); Nigerian Helon Habila (2001); Kenyan Binyavanga Wainaina (2002); Kenyan Yvonne Owuor (2003); Zimbabwean Brian Chikwava (2004); Nigerian Segun Afolabi (2005); South African Mary Watson (2006); Ugandan Monica Arac de Nyeko (2007); South African Henrietta Rose-Innes (2008); Nigerian EC Osondu (2009); Sierra Leonean Olufemi Terry (2010); Zimbabwean NoViolet Bulawayo (2011); Nigerian Rotimi Babatunde (2012); Nigerian Tope Folarin (2013); Kenyan Okwiri Oduor (2014); Zambian Namwali Serpell (2015); and South African Lidudumalingani (2016).

The five shortlisted stories, alongside the 12 stories written at the Caine Prize annual workshop, are published annually by New Internationalist (UK); ‘amaBooks (Zimbabwe), FEMRITE (Uganda), Gadsden Publishers (Zambia), Huza Press (Rwanda), Interlink (USA), Jacana Media (South Africa), Kwani? (Kenya), Mkuki na Nyota (Tanzania), Lantern Books (Nigeria), Redsea Cultural Foundation (Somaliland, Somalia, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Sudan, South Sudan and UAE) and Sub-Saharan Publishers (Ghana).

Redsea Cultural Foundation is celebrating 10 years of Hargeysa International Book Fair which will take place 22-27 July with the theme "Connectivity". With so many African countries having direct access the 2017 anthology, it will support connectivity through literature within the African continent.

Books are available from the publishers direct or from the Africa Book Centre, African Books Collective or Amazon.

The New Internationalist edition was published in July 2016 (ISBN 978-1-78026-320-5) and is available at https://newint.org/books/fiction/caine-prize-2016/

The Interlink edition published in the USA (ISBN 781566560160) is available at http://www.interlinkbooks.com/product_info.php?products_id=3410

The Caine Prize is principally supported by The Oppenheimer Memorial Trust, The Miles Morland Foundation, The Carnegie Corporation, the Booker Prize Foundation, Sigrid Rausing & Eric Abraham, The Wyfold Charitable Trust, the Royal Over-Seas League and John and Judy Niepold.  Other funders and partners include, The British Council, Georgetown University (USA), The Lannan Center for Poetics and Social Practice, The van Agtmael Family Charitable Fund, Rupert and Clare McCammon, Adam and Victoria Freudenheim, Arindam Bhattacherjee, Worldreader and other generous donors.

Key dates 2017:

  • 31 January: Entry deadline
  • Mid-May: Shortlist announced
  • 3 July: Winner decided and announced in London

For further information, photos or to arrange interviews, please contact:

Henry Gilliver
henry@raittorr.co.uk
020 7922 7719

Caine Prize receives 148 entries from 22 African countries

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
28 February 2017

 

CAINE PRIZE RECEIVES 148 ENTRIES FROM 22 AFRICAN COUNTRIES

In its eighteenth year, the Caine Prize for African Writing has received 148 qualifying short stories from 22 African countries, bringing the total number of eligible submissions since the inception of the Prize to over 1,600 from 47 African countries.

The 2017 judges, who were announced at the end of last year, will meet in mid May to decide on the 5 shortlisted stories. Each shortlisted writer will be awarded £500, with the eventual winner awarded a £10,000 prize.

The Award-winning author and poet, Nii Ayikwei Parkes, will Chair the judging panel. He will be joined by the 2007 Caine Prize winner, Monica Arac de Nyeko; distinguished author and Chair of the English Department at Georgetown University, Professor Ricardo Ortiz; Libyan author and human rights campaigner, Ghazi Gheblawi; and distinguished African literary scholar, Dr Ranka Primorac, University of Southampton.

Caine Prize Director, Dr Lizzy Attree, commented on the entries, saying: "We are delighted that the number of countries represented among the authors submitted has remained high and this year we have received eligible entries from Niger and Swaziland for the first time. Nations with long histories of representation in both our shortlist and previous winners feature again, with a record number of entries from Nigeria, but we are pleased to see an increase in entries from Sudan, as well as Gambia, Lesotho, Liberia, Rwanda, Senegal, and Tanzania.”
 
For the first time the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in London will host the Caine Prize award dinner as part of their programme celebrating its centenary year. The winner will be announced at Senate House on Monday 3 July 2017.

The five shortlisted stories, alongside the stories written at the annual Caine Prize workshop, are published annually by New Internationalist in the UK and Interlink in the US. In 2017 the anthologies will be co-published with partners in nine African countries; ‘amaBooks (Zimbabwe), Gadsden Publishers (Zambia), FEMRITE (Uganda), Huza Press (Rwanda), Jacana Media (South Africa), Kwani? (Kenya), Mkuki na Nyota (Tanzania), Lantern Books (Nigeria) and Sub-Saharan Publishers (Ghana).

This year’s workshop, which will be the fifteenth, will be held in Tanzania.  Caine Prize workshops are held in Africa for writers who have been shortlisted for the Caine Prize and other talented writers who have come to the Prize’s attention through the selection process. Each workshop consists of 12 writers from different African countries, who convene for ten days to read and discuss work in progress and to learn from two more experienced writers, who act as tutors or animateurs.

Stories produced at the writers’ workshop are published in the Caine Prize Anthology and are submitted by New Internationalist to the competition in subsequent years. Shortlisted for the 2016 Caine Prize, ‘The Lifebloom Gift’ first appeared in The Gonjon Pin (New Internationalist, 2014), having been written by Abdul Adan at the writer’s workshop in Zimbabwe.
 

-Ends-

 

NOTES TO EDITORS

The Caine Prize of £10,000 is awarded annually for a short story by an African writer published in English (indicative length 3,000 to 10,000 words). An African writer is taken to mean someone who was born in Africa, or who is a national of an African country, or who has a parent who is African by birth or nationality. Shortlisted writers received £500 each.

The Prize, awarded for African creative writing, is named after the late Sir Michael Caine, former Chairman of Booker plc and Chairman of the Booker Prize management committee for nearly 25 years.

The African winners of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Wole Soyinka and J M Coetzee, are Patrons of The Caine Prize. Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne is President of the Council, Ben Okri OBE is Vice President, Dr Delia Jarrett-Macauley is the Chairperson, Adam Freudenheim is the Deputy Chairperson and Dr Lizzy Attree is the Director.

Previous winners are: Sudan’s Leila Aboulela (2000); Nigerian Helon Habila (2001); Kenyan Binyavanga Wainaina (2002); Kenyan Yvonne Owuor (2003); Zimbabwean Brian Chikwava (2004); Nigerian Segun Afolabi (2005); South African Mary Watson (2006); Ugandan Monica Arac de Nyeko (2007); South African Henrietta Rose-Innes (2008); Nigerian EC Osondu (2009); Sierra Leonean Olufemi Terry (2010); Zimbabwean NoViolet Bulawayo (2011); Nigerian Rotimi Babatunde (2012); Nigerian Tope Folarin (2013); Kenyan Okwiri Oduor (2014); Zambian Namwali Serpell (2015); and South African Lidudumalingani (2016).

The five shortlisted stories, alongside the 12 stories written at the Caine Prize annual workshop, are published annually by New Internationalist (UK); Jacana Media (South Africa); Huza Press (Rwanda); Lantern Books (Nigeria); Kwani? (Kenya); Mkuki na Nyota (Tanzania); Sub-Saharan Publishers (Ghana); FEMRITE (Uganda); Interlink (USA); Gadsden Publishers (Zambia); and ‘amaBooks (Zimbabwe).

Books are available from the publishers direct or from the Africa Book Centre, African Books Collective or Amazon.

The New Internationalist edition was published in July 2016 (ISBN 978-1-78026-320-5) and is available at https://newint.org/books/fiction/caine-prize-2016/

The Interlink edition published in the USA (ISBN 781566560160) is available at http://www.interlinkbooks.com/product_info.php?products_id=3410

The Caine Prize is principally supported by The Oppenheimer Memorial Trust, The Miles Morland Foundation, The Carnegie Corporation, the Booker Prize Foundation, Sigrid Rausing & Eric Abraham, The British Council, The Wyfold Charitable Trust, the Royal Over-Seas League and John and Judy Niepold.  Other funders and partners include, The British Council, Georgetown University (USA), The Lannan Center for Poetics and Social Practice, The van Agtmael Family Charitable Fund, Rupert and Clare McCammon, Adam and Victoria Freudenheim,  Arindam Bhattacherjee, Worldreader and other generous donors.

Key dates 2017:

  • 31 January: Entry deadline
  • Mid-May: Shortlist announced
  • 3 July: Winner decided and announced in London

For further information, photos or to arrange interviews, please contact:

Henry Gilliver
henry@raittorr.co.uk
020 7922 7719

Follow us on Twitter (@CainePrize), Facebook, Instagram, and visit our website: www.caineprize.com

Tribute to Buchi Emecheta (1944 – 2017)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
1 February 2017

 

TRIBUTE TO BUCHI EMECHETA (1944 – 2017)

The Council of the Caine Prize for African Writing pays tribute to Buchi Emecheta, a long-standing member of the Caine Prize Advisory Council, who died peacefully at her home in London on 25 January 2017, aged 72.

Buchi Emecheta was a Nigerian author who received great acclaim for her work both in the UK and Nigeria, as the author of more than 20 books. Born in Lagos, her father died when she was very young.  She won a scholarship to the Methodist Girls’ High School, married in 1960 aged sixteen, and had her first daughter that year. Her first son, Sylvester, was born in 1961 and in 1962 she joined her husband in London where he had gone to study. She had her second son in 1962, her second daughter in 1964, and in 1966, aged 22 and pregnant with her third daughter, she left her husband. While working to support her five children as a single mother, she wrote in the early mornings and studied at night classes to obtain an honours degree in Sociology.  Her first book, In The Ditch, details her experience as a poor, single parent in London. It was followed by Second-Class Citizen, The Bride Price, The Slave Girl, which was awarded the Jock Campbell Award, The Joys of Motherhood, Destination Biafra, Naira Power, The Rape of Shavi, Double Yoke, A Kind of Marriage, Gwendolen, Kehinde and The New Tribe. Her autobiography, Head Above Water, appeared in 1986 to much acclaim.

Chair of the Caine Prize Council Dr Delia Jarrett-Macauley recalls: “Many years ago, shortly after graduation, I enrolled on a Birkbeck College course on African women writers led by Buchi Emecheta. A warm and spirited teacher, she sensibly introduced us to her books Second-Class Citizen and The Joys of Motherhood, and other passionate novels by writers of her generation. Buchi made us laugh and nudged us to be determined. She described rising at dawn to write before work and finding inspiration in her family's stories. She was a true pioneer and will be greatly missed.” 

Vice-President of the Caine Prize and MAN Booker Prize-winning author Ben Okri said that Buchi Emecheta “re-ignited the rich place of women at the heart of African literature and wrote brave tales about survival and motherhood. Without her the current strong generation of women writers, who write well and fearlessly, would not exist. We owe her courage a debt of gratitude. May she rest in peace.”

Margaret Busby, Caine Prize Advisory Council member, was Buchi's editor and publisher at Allison & Busby for more than a decade in the 1970s-80s, and says: “It is with pride and a feeling of privilege that I now reflect on the fact that it was on my watch, so to speak, that her best remembered books were published - Second-Class Citizen (1974), The Bride Price (1976), The Slave Girl (1977), The Joys of Motherhood (1979), Destination Biafra (1982), and also her books for children. Sadly, her health deteriorated progressively over the past seven years, following a stroke, so her writing career was prematurely halted. But the resonant impact her work made on readers and fellow writers lives on."

Nii Ayikwei Parkes, 2017 Chair of Judges and council member, commented that “Buchi Emecheta was a model of the kind of humility that makes a great writer; never self-aggrandising, always ready to listen. What made her great was that she had, in tandem with her humility, a self-possession that meant that, like Toni Morrison, she knew her voice, her story, was central and complete, needed no validation from any quarter. Her confident representation of certain realities of Nigerian womanhood gave courage to a generation of young women of the global south to express themselves fully and unapologetically. I am certain her work has played no small part in the rich array of complex creative work being produced by young writers today. From her I learned that it’s important to put work out there to start a conversation, to be part of the world of conversations that affect us all as humans.”

Wangui wa Goro, Caine Prize Advisory Council member, added: “Buchi Emecheta's towering presence is always there and will remain.  She was a fierce trailblazer, both in her writing and in her insistence on being heard.  I had the privilege of knowing Buchi, both in the literary world and privately, and she was as funny as she was generous.  She was honest about the struggles in her personal life and in the publishing and reception of her work. Her stance and courage have been vindicated as through her legacy, she has opened the doors for, and to, so many.  She remains iconic to many African literature scholars and others, and especially for us here in the UK, both for her brave writing, and for her presence for younger generations of African women writers, such as mine.  I owe a great deal of my own inspiration to women like Buchi and feel blessed to have known her and her work.  May she rest in peace.”

James Currey, Caine Prize Advisory Council member and publisher of the African Writers Series at Heinemann, states that “Buchi Emecheta's work was of double importance. She, Flora Nwapa and Bessie Head gave women from Africa the idea that they might get published. She also gave women - and indeed men - the idea that they could write about the wider world of the diaspora."

She served as a judge for the Caine Prize in 2001, alongside J.M. Coetzee, Patron of the Caine Prize, the year that Helon Habila won. Nick Elam, Administrator of the Caine Prize from 1999 to 2011, recalls: “Buchi did not reveal her preference for Helon as winner, for fear of its being discounted as mere partisanship in favour of the Nigerian candidate, but she let out an explosive ululation when it became clear the decision was going his way.”

2001 Caine Prize winner Helon Habila, now Professor of Creative Writing at George Mason University, added: “Buchi's death is a tragic loss. She was a supportive, positive role model. Her personal story of overcoming adversity and abuse to become the writer she was is inspiring not just to women but to all of us. We thank her for her books.”

2004 Caine Prize winner and 2015 Caine Prize Judge, Brian Chikwava, added: “It is not just the stories Emecheta chose to tell that were bold and inspiring but also the story of her commitment to writing, even when the odds were overwhelmingly stacked against her. The first and last time I saw her she told us, a group of writers, that if you’re writing just to get published and not to earn from your work, then you are a blockhead. That sets things into perspective for any beginner writer.”

Caine Prize Director Lizzy Attree remembers first meeting Buchi Emecheta as a result of her contributions to the African Visions series at the British Library, programmed by the Africa Centre in Covent Garden, which ran from 2001 – 2005. Buchi was also involved in the Reading Africa libraries project organised and funded by SABDET (Southern African Book Development Education Trust) and co-produced by Lizzy with Kate Arafa.

Buchi Emecheta was a great supporter of the Caine prize and we are extremely grateful for her service as a member of the Advisory Council. She set a great example for a new generation of African writers through her life and work, and her work was an inspiration for the shortlisted and winning authors throughout the years.  She will be greatly missed.

Buchi Emecheta died peacefully in London on 25 January 2017.  She is survived by three of her five children.

--- Additional Comments and Tributes to note ---

Further tributes to Buchi Emecheta have been posted online by numerous friends and admirers. 

Read the tribute in the Guardian led by Bernardine Evaristo which includes comments from Margaret Busby, Aminatta Forna and Kadija Sesay here.

Read the tribute in the New Statesman written by Buchi Emecheta’s son Sylvester Onwordi here

Chika Unigwe posted on Facebook (26 January 2017) about meeting Buchi in 2004, the year Brian Chikwava won the Caine Prize: “I remember meeting Buchi years ago in London (with other Caine Prize shortlisted writers Monica Arac de Nyeko, Brian Chikwava, Parselelo Kantai and Doreen Baingana) and the conversation turned to the whys of our writing. A journalist asked if we wrote for the love of writing or for money. And we all said for the love of it of course. Buchi gave us an earful.  ‘You don't hear journalists say they do their jobs for the love of it! There is nothing wrong with making money from writing! It's a job like any other!’ (Or something along those lines) She taught me the very valuable lesson that pursuing your passion and making money from it are not mutually exclusive.”

-Ends-

For more information:

Henry Gilliver

henry@raittorr.co.uk

020 7922 7719

 

Caine Prize 2017 Judging Panel Announced

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

12 December 2016

Caine Prize 2017 judging panel announced

The Caine Prize for African Writing has announced the five judges for the 2017 Prize. The panel will be chaired by Nii Ayikwei Parkes, award winning author, poet and editor. He will be joined by the 2007 Caine Prize winner, Monica Arac de Nyeko; accomplished author and Chair of the English Department at Georgetown University, Professor Ricardo Ortiz; Libyan author and human rights campaigner, Ghazi Gheblawi; and distinguished African literary scholar, Dr Ranka Primorac.

The 2017 Chair of Judges, Nii Ayikwei Parkes, said: "I have been a consumer of fiction from Africa for close to four decades, revelling in its range, its humour, its insights and dynamic linguistic palette. So, I am ecstatic to be asked to chair the panel for this year's Caine Prize and look forward to working with this incredible assembly of judges. There is, of course, the selfish pleasure, as an editor, of getting a first look at some of the finest writing coming from the continent and its foreign branches."

The deadline for submissions to the 2017 Caine Prize is 31 January. Publishers are encouraged to submit qualifying stories in good time. Submissions are welcome year round and late submissions will be entered in to the competition for the following year.

The judging panel will meet in May 2017 to determine which entries will make the shortlist. An announcement confirming the shortlist will be made in mid-May.

For the first time in the 18 year history of the Caine Prize, the award will be announced on Monday 3 July at Senate House, London, in collaboration with the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), which is celebrating its centenary.

“Memories We Lost”, by South African author Lidudumalingani, won the 2016 Prize and is included in the Caine Prize 2016 anthology, The Daily Assortment of Astonishing Things, published by New Internationalist in the UK and supplied as a print ready PDF to several African co-publishers.

Commenting on “Memories We Lost”, Chair of the 2016 judging panel, Dr Delia Jarrett-Macauley, said: “This is a troubling piece, depicting the great love between two young siblings in a beautifully drawn Eastern Cape. Multi-layered, and gracefully narrated, this short story leaves the reader full of sympathy and wonder at the plight of its protagonists”.

-Ends-

Notes to Editors

The Caine Prize of £10,000 is awarded annually for a short story by an African writer published in English (indicative length 3,000 to 10,000 words). An African writer is taken to mean someone who was born in Africa, or who is a national of an African country, or who has a parent who is African by birth or nationality.  Shortlisted writers received £500 each.

The Prize, awarded for African creative writing, is named after the late Sir Michael Caine, former Chairman of Booker plc and Chairman of the Booker Prize management committee for nearly 25 years.

The African winners of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Wole Soyinka and J M Coetzee, are Patrons of The Caine Prize. Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne is President of the Council, Ben Okri OBE is Vice President, Dr Delia Jarrett-Macauley is the Chairperson and Dr Lizzy Attree is the Director.

Previous winners are: Sudan’s Leila Aboulela (2000); Nigerian Helon Habila (2001); Kenyan Binyavanga Wainaina (2002); Kenyan Yvonne Owuor (2003); Zimbabwean Brian Chikwava (2004); Nigerian Segun Afolabi (2005); South African Mary Watson (2006); Ugandan Monica Arac de Nyeko (2007); South African Henrietta Rose-Innes (2008); Nigerian EC Osondu (2009); Sierra Leonean Olufemi Terry (2010); Zimbabwean NoViolet Bulawayo (2011); Nigerian Rotimi Babatunde (2012); Nigerian Tope Folarin (2013); Kenyan Okwiri Oduor (2014); Zambian Namwali Serpell (2015); and South African Lidudumalingani (2016).

The five shortlisted stories, alongside the 12 stories written at the Caine Prize annual workshop, are published annually by New Internationalist (UK); Jacana Media (South Africa); Lantern Books (Nigeria); Kwani? (Kenya); Sub-Saharan Publishers (Ghana); FEMRITE (Uganda); Interlink (USA); Gadsden Publishers (Zambia); and ‘amaBooks (Zimbabwe). Books are available from the publishers or from the Africa Book Centre, African Books Collective or Amazon.

The New Internationalist edition was published in July 2016 (ISBN 978-1-78026-320-5) and is available at https://newint.org/books/fiction/caine-prize-2016/

The Interlink edition published in the USA (ISBN 781566560160) is available at http://www.interlinkbooks.com/product_info.php?products_id=3410

The Caine Prize is supported by The Oppenheimer Memorial Trust, The Miles Morland Foundation, The Carnegie Corporation, the Booker Prize Foundation, Sigrid Rausing & Eric Abraham, The British Council, The Wyfold Charitable Trust, the Royal Over-Seas League, Commonwealth Writers, an initiative of the Commonwealth Foundation, John and Judy Niepold, Adam and Victoria Freudenheim,  Arindam Bhattacherjee and other generous donors.

Key dates 2017:

  • 31 January: Entry deadline

  • Mid-May: Shortlist announced

  • 3 July: Winner decided and announced in London

For further information, photos or to arrange interviews, please contact:

Henry Gilliver

henry@raittorr.co.uk

020 7922 7719

Follow us on Twitter (@CainePrize), Facebook, Instagram, and visit our website: www.caineprize.com

New Chair of Trustees

Caine_Prize_2016_Delia Jarrett Macauley.jpg

Dr Delia Jarrett-Macauley has been appointed Chair of the Board of Trustees and of the Advisory Council of the Caine Prize. Delia will succeed Jonathan Taylor CBE, a founder of the Prize, who has retired having served as Chairman since its inception seventeen years ago.

 



On retiring Jonathan said “I have been very glad and proud to have led the Caine Prize since its foundation. We have come a long way and the Prize has provided a launching pad for very many successful literary careers. I am delighted that Delia will be succeeding me.  She is an accomplished writer, broadcaster, academic and consultant. Most recently she has chaired the panel of judges for the 2016 Caine Prize. Under her leadership the Prize will continue to develop and she will take it in exciting new directions.” Jonathan was Chairman of the Booker Prize Foundation from 2001 to 2015. He was also Chair of the Trustees of the International Prize of Arabic Fiction.

Delia added “I am honoured and delighted to have been appointed as the Chair.  I hope to push the boundaries of the Caine Prize: a venture that attracts the greatest literary talent from the African continent.  I am looking forward to working with Lizzy Attree, our Director, and with the Board of Trustees and Council members.”

In addition to Delia, the Board of Trustees has been reinforced and rejuvenated by four new members. They are Gus Casely-Hayford, cultural historian; Adam Freudenheim, publisher of Pushkin Press; Fiammetta Rocco, books and art editor at the Economist; and Véronique Tadjo, an author and poet.  The full board is listed in the notes, together with brief biographical details on the new members.

The Caine Prize is now regarded as the most successful and significant award for African literary fiction. Since 2000, every winner has gone on to achieve literary success, as have many of the shortlisted writers. Media interest in the prize has also grown year-on-year, with extensive coverage in leading broadcasts and publications in the UK and across Africa.

The Caine Prize holds an annual African workshop that brings aspiring writers together from across the continent to write, read and discuss work in progress. Stories written at the workshop together with the shortlist are published each year by New Internationalist and 8 African co-publishers.

On 4 July Delia announced that this year’s Caine Prize winner was Lidudumalingani from South Africa, for his short story Memories We Lost’, published in Incredible Journey: Stories That Move You (Burnet Media, South Africa, 2015). The announcement was made at the Bodleian Library in Oxford. ‘Memories We Lost’ is available to read here.
 

-Ends-

 Notes to Editors

The Prize is named after the late Sir Michael Caine, former Chairman of Booker plc and Chairman of the Booker Prize management committee for nearly 25 years.
The Caine Prize is awarded every year for a short story by an African writer published in English (indicative length 3,000 to 10,000 words). An African writer is taken to mean someone who was born in Africa, or who is a national of an African country, or who has a parent who is African by birth or nationality.

The African winners of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Wole Soyinka and J M Coetzee, are Patrons of The Caine Prize. Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne is President of the Council and Ben Okri OBE is Vice President. Dr Lizzy Attree is the Director. 

The Trustees of the Caine Prize are: Alicia Adams, Ellah Wakatama Allfrey, Gus Casely-Hayford, Laurence Cockcroft, Adam Freudenheim, John Niepold, Delia Jarrett-Macauley, Ed Robinson, Fiammetta Rocco, Véronique Tadjo and Jonathan Taylor.
 
Brief details of the new trustees:

Delia Jarrett-Macauley is a writer of Sierra Leonean parentage, based in London. Among her published works is the Orwell-prize winning novel Moses, Citizen and Me. She has published two edited collections, the most recent being Shakespeare, Race and Performance –The Diverse Bard. She has held fellowships at the LSE, Warwick and The Women’s Library, London and is widely experienced in consultancy work particularly in the arts and cultural spheres. http://www.deliajarrettmacauley.com/Delia_Jarrett-Macauley/Biography.html

Augustus Casely-Hayford is a cultural curator, historian and broadcaster of Ghanaian ancestry. He has written and produced programmes for BBC2, BBC World and Channel 4 including the highly regarded Lost Kingdoms of Africa series. He is a cultural historian and teaching fellow at SOAS bringing with him a wealth of experience of the UK Arts sector and international contacts in the arts and broadcasting. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gus_Casely-Hayford

Adam Freudenheim is publisher, managing director and owner of the very successful independent publisher Pushkin Press. Before acquiring Pushkin he held positions with Penguin Press, Granta and Yale University Press. He is a member of the Booker Prize Foundation Advisory Committee. He brings knowledge of the publishing industry along with commercial and financial expertise. http://pushkinpress.com/about/ 

Fiammetta Rocco is third-generation Kenyan living in London and fluent in six languages. She is currently Culture Editor of the Economist. Fiammetta has previously been a wide-ranging and award-winning journalist and a writer of nonfiction. She is the Administrator of the Man Booker International Prize and a trustee of the Edinburgh Literary Festival. She brings experience of prize administration as well as prize judging, and has a strong international reputation. http://themanbookerprize.com/people/fiammetta-rocco

Véronique Tadjo is Ivorienne and resident in London. She is an award-winning author and poet, an artist and academic with a distinguished career until recently as a professor at Wits University in South Africa. She has mentored a significant number of Caine Prize Writers Workshops. http://veroniquetadjo.com/ 
 
The Caine Prize is supported by The Oppenheimer Memorial Trust, The Miles Morland Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Booker Prize Foundation, Sigrid Rausing and Eric Abraham, Imara, The British Council, The Wyfold Charitable Trust, the Royal Over-Seas League, Adam and Victoria Freudenheim, John and Judy Niepold, Arindam Bhattacharjee and other generous donors.
 
For more information:

Henry Gilliver
henry@raittorr.co.uk
020 7922 7719
07725250052

Lidudumalingani wins seventeenth Caine Prize for African Writing

For Immediate Release
Monday, 4 July 2016


Lidudumalingani has won the 2016 Caine Prize for African Writing, described as Africa’s leading literary award, for his short story entitled 'Memories We Lost' published in Incredible Journey: Stories That Move You (Burnet Media, South Africa, 2015). The Chair of Judges, Delia Jarrett-Macauley, announced Lidudumalingani as the winner of the £10,000 prize at a dinner held this evening (Monday, 4 July) at the Bodleian Library in Oxford.

‘Memories We Lost’ tells the emotionally charged story of a girl who acts as protector of her sister, whose serious mental-health problems cause consternation in a South African village. Her situation deteriorates as her care is entrusted to Nkunzi, a local man who employs traditional techniques to rid people of their demons.

Delia Jarrett-Macauley praised the story, saying, "The winning story explores a difficult subject - how traditional beliefs in a rural community are used to tackle schizophrenia. this is a troubling piece, depicting the great love between two young siblings in a beautifully drawn Eastern Cape. Multi-layered, and gracefully narrated, this short story leaves the reader full of sympathy and wonder at the plight of its protagonists".  

Lidudumalingani is a writer, filmmaker and photographer. He was born in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa, in a village called Zikhovane. Lidudumalingani has published short stories, non-fiction and criticism in various publications. His films have been screened at a number of film festivals.

Lidudumalingani's story 'Memories We Lost' is available here.

Lidudumalingani was joined on the 2016 shortlist by:

• Lesley Nneka Arimah (Nigeria) for ‘What it Means When a Man Falls From the Sky’ published in Catapult (Catapult, USA, 2015).
Read ‘What it Means When a Man Falls From the Sky’

• Tope Folarin (Nigeria) for ‘Genesis’ published in Callaloo (Johns Hopkins University Press, USA, 2014).
Read ‘Genesis’

• Bongani Kona (Zimbabwe) for ‘At Your Requiem’ published in Incredible Journey: Stories That Move You (Burnet Media, South Africa, 2015).
Read ‘At Your Requiem’

•Abdul Adan (Somalia/Kenya) for ‘The Lifebloom Gift’ published in The Gonjon Pin and Other Stories: The Caine Prize for African Writing 2014 (New Internationalist, United Kingdom, 2014)
Read ‘The Lifebloom Gift’
 

The panel of judges was chaired by Delia Jarrett-Macauley – member of the Caine Prize Council and judge for the 2007 Caine Prize for African Writing. She is the author of the literary biographyThe life of Una Marson 1905-1965, and of the Orwell prize-winning novel Moses, Citizen and Me (2005).

Alongside Delia on the panel of judges are: acclaimed film, television and theatre actor, Adjoa Andoh; writer and founding member of the Nairobi-based writers’ collective, Storymoja, and founder of the Storymoja Festival, Muthoni Garland; Associate Professor and Director of African American Studies at Georgetown University, Washington DC, Dr Robert J Patterson; and South African writer and 2006 Caine Prize winner, Mary Watson.

Once again the winner of the Caine Prize will be given the opportunity to take up a month’s residence at Georgetown University, as a Writer-in-Residence at the Lannan Center for Poetics and Social Practice. The winner will also be invited to speak at the Library of Congress. Each shortlisted writer will also receive £500.  The winner is invited to take part in the Open Book Festival in Cape Town, Storymoja in Nairobi and Ake Festival in Abeokuta, Nigeria.

Last year the Caine Prize was won by Zambian writer Namwali Serpell. Namwali is an associate professor at the University of California, Berkeley English department. Her first book of literary criticism, Seven Modes of Uncertainty, was published in 2014. Since winning the Caine Prize, the world rights to Namwali’s first book of fiction, The Old Drift, were pre-empted and it will be published by Hogarth in the US and Chatto and Windus in the UK.


The New Internationalist 2016 anthology is now published and it includes all of the shortlisted stories along with 12 other short stories written at the Caine Prize 2016 workshop in Zambia. You can buy the anthology at https://newint.org/books/fiction/caine-prize-2016/. The anthology is supplied as a print ready pdf to 8 African co-publishers.

 

-Ends-

 

Notes to Editors

About the Caine Prize

The Caine Prize, awarded annually for African creative writing, is named after the late Sir Michael Caine, former Chairman of Booker plc and Chairman of the Booker Prize management committee for nearly 25 years. The Prize is awarded for a short story by an African writer published in English (indicative length 3,000 to 10,000 words). An African writer is taken to mean someone who was born in Africa, or who is a national of an African country, or who has a parent who is African by birth or nationality.

The African winners of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Wole Soyinka and J M Coetzee, are Patrons of The Caine Prize. Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne is President of the Council, Ben Okri OBE is Vice President, Jonathan Taylor CBE is the Chairman, Ellah Wakatama Allfrey OBE is the Deputy Chairperson and Dr Lizzy Attree is the Director.

Full biographies of the shortlistees are available at http://caineprize.com/2016-shortlist/

Full biographies of the 2016 judges are available at https://caineprize.com/the-judges-2016

This year 166 short stories from writers representing 23 African countries were received and entered into the 2016 Caine Prize before they were whittled down to the final 5. Last year 153 qualifying stories were submitted to the judges from 17 countries.

Previous winners are Sudan’s Leila Aboulela (2000), Nigerian Helon Habila (2001), Kenyan Binyavanga Wainaina (2002), Kenyan Yvonne Owuor (2003), Zimbabwean Brian Chikwava (2004), Nigerian Segun Afolabi (2005), South African Mary Watson (2006), Ugandan Monica Arac de Nyeko (2007), South African Henrietta Rose-Innes (2008), Nigerian EC Osondu (2009), Sierra Leonean Olufemi Terry (2010), Zimbabwean NoViolet Bulawayo (2011), Nigerian Tope Folarin (2013), Kenyan Okwiri Oduor (2014); and Zambian Namwali Serpell (2015).

The five shortlisted stories, alongside stories written at Caine Prize workshop held in Zambia in March 2016, are published annually by New Internationalist (UK), Jacana Media (South Africa), LanternBooks (United States), Kwani? (Kenya), Sub-Saharan Publishers (Ghana), FEMRITE (Uganda), Bookworld Publishers (Zambia), Langaa Research and Publishing (Cameroon) and amaBooks (Zimbabwe). Books are available from the publishers or from the Africa Book Centre, African Books Collective or Amazon.

The Caine Prize is supported by The Oppenheimer Memorial Trust, The Miles Morland Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Booker Prize Foundation, Sigrid Rausing and Eric Abraham, The British Council, The Wyfold Charitable Trust, the Royal Over-Seas League, Imara, Adam and Victoria Freudenheim, John and Judy Niepold, Arindam Bhattacharjee and other generous donors.

For more information: 

Henry Gilliver

Account Manager

Raitt Orr & Associates

+44(0) 20 7922 7719

+44(0) 77252 50052

 

Seventeenth Caine Prize shortlist announced

The five-writer shortlist for the 2016 Caine Prize for African Writing has been announced by Chair of judges, writer and academic, Delia Jarrett-Macauley. The 2016 shortlist includes a former Caine Prize winner and a former regional winner of the Commonwealth Short Story Prize.

Delia Jarrett-Macauley described the shortlist as, ‘an engrossing, well-crafted and dauntless pack of stories.’

‘The high standard of the entries was clear throughout and particularly noteworthy was the increasing number of fantasy fictions [with] the sci-fi trend resonating in several excellent stories. My fellow judges commented on the pleasure of reading the stories, the gift of being exposed to the exciting short fictions being produced by African writers today and the general shift away from politics towards more intimate subjects – though recent topics such as the Ebola crisis were being wrestled with.’

She added, ‘It was inspiring to note the amount of risk-taking in both subject matter and style, wild or lyrical voices matching the tempered measured prose writers, and stories tackling uneasy topics, ranging from an unsettling, unreliable narrator’s tale of airport scrutiny, to a science-fictional approach towards the measurement of grief, a young child’s coming to grips with family dysfunction, the big drama of rivalling siblings and the silent, numbing effects of loss.’

‘The panel is proud to have shortlisted writers from across the continent, finding stories that are compelling, well-crafted and thought-provoking.’

The 2016 shortlist comprises:

Abdul Adan (Somalia/Kenya) for ‘The Lifebloom Gift’ published in The Gonjon Pin and Other Stories: The Caine Prize for African Writing 2014 (New Internationalist, United Kingdom, 2014)

Read ‘The Lifebloom Gift’

Lesley Nneka Arimah (Nigeria) for ‘What it Means When a Man Falls From the Sky’ published in Catapult (Catapult, USA, 2015)

Read ‘What it Means When a Man Falls From the Sky’

Tope Folarin (Nigeria) for ‘Genesis’ published in Callaloo (Johns Hopkins University Press, USA, 2014)

Read ‘Genesis’

Folarin won the 2013 Caine Prize for African Writing

Bongani Kona (Zimbabwe) for ‘At Your Requiem’ published in Incredible Journey: Stories That Move You (Burnet Media, South Africa, 2015)

Read “At Your Requiem”

Lidudumalingani (South Africa) for ‘Memories We Lost’ published in Incredible Journey: Stories That Move You (Burnet Media, South Africa, 2015)

Read ‘Memories We Lost’ 

The full panel of judges, joining Delia Jarrett-Macauley, includes  acclaimed film, television and theatre actor, Adjoa Andoh; writer and founding member of the Nairobi-based writers’ collective, Storymoja, and founder of the Storymoja Festival, Muthoni Garland; Associate Professor and Director of African American Studies at Georgetown University, Washington DC, Dr Robert J Patterson; and South Africanwriter and 2006 Caine Prize winner, Mary Watson. 

The winner of the £10,000 prize will be announced at an award ceremony and dinner at the Weston Library, Bodleian Libraries, Oxford, on Monday 4 July. Each shortlisted writer will also receive £500.

Each of these stories will be published in New Internationalist’s Caine Prize 2016 Anthology in July and through co-publishers across Africa, who receive a print-ready PDF free of charge from New Internationalist.

Notes to Editors

About the Caine Prize

The Caine Prize, awarded annually for African creative writing, is named after the late Sir Michael Caine, former Chairman of Booker plc and Chairman of the Booker Prize management committee for nearly 25 years. The Prize is awarded for a short story by an African writer published in English (indicative length 3,000 to 10,000 words). An African writer is taken to mean someone who was born in Africa, or who is a national of an African country, or who has a parent who is African by birth or nationality.

The African winners of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Wole Soyinka and J M Coetzee, are Patrons of The Caine Prize. Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne is President of the Council, Ben Okri OBE is Vice President, Jonathan Taylor CBE is the Chairman, Ellah Wakatama Allfrey OBE is the Deputy Chairperson and Dr Lizzy Attree is the Director.